Last of the blue and gray serrano richard a. Last of the Blue and Gray : Old Men, Stolen Glory, and the Mystery That Outlived the Civil War by Richard A. Serrano (2013, Hardcover) for sale online 2019-02-22

Last of the blue and gray serrano richard a Rating: 7,8/10 1354 reviews

Last of the Blue and Gray by Richard A. Serrano (ebook)

last of the blue and gray serrano richard a

Unfortunately, any true survivors would be well past 100 years old; their memories, to be charitable, would be foggy, and the value of their recollections questionable. Albert Woolson, 109 years old, slipped in and out of a coma at a Duluth, Minnesota, hospital, his memories as a Yankee drummer boy slowly dimming. A compact, engrossing historical meditation with clear relevance to current controversies over race and punishment. The author, who appears to focus on somewhat dark historical mysteries, writes about the attempts of various people--most of them Southerners--who attempted to steal glory and fraudulently receive pensions by claiming to be aged Civil War veterans. Everyone loves a mystery, and here is an important one: Who was the last living Civil War veteran? Albert Woolson, 109 years old, slipped in and out of a coma at a Duluth, Minnesota, hospital, his memories as a Yankee drummer boy slowly dimming. It was a nice, neat story, but it wasn''t true. It's a good survey book of the issues--the end of the G.

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Richard A. Serrano

last of the blue and gray serrano richard a

Serrano masterfully maintains the tension throughout, until he finally reveals the truth which some still find controversial. Serrano shared in two Pulitzer Prizes for coverage of the Hyatt sky walks disaster in Kansas City and the King riots in Los Angeles. This is a fine addition to Civil War collections. That includes a South clinging to a romanticized view of life before the Civil War or the War of Northern Aggression, as they called it , as well as character failures of political figures unwilling to call out the pretenders' lies despite overwhelming evidence of fabricated accounts. Short Synopsis Journalist Richard A.

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Los Angeles Times

last of the blue and gray serrano richard a

One man had indeed served honorably, but the other man had not served at all. Both were well into their 100s as the Civil War centennial drew near, and neither was lucid enough to be counted on to provide dependable testimonies of their time at war. Eventually, attention was riveted upon two men, Union veteran Albert Woolson and Confederate veteran Walter Williams. Unknown to the public, centennial officials, and the White House too, one of these men was indeed a veteran of that horrible conflict and one according to the best evidence nothing but a fraud. It was a nice, neat story, but it wasn't true. Last of the Blue and Gray--Old Men, Stolen Glory, and the Mystery That Outlived The Civil War by Richard A. I am gld I did not know this when I was ten.

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Richard A. Serrano

last of the blue and gray serrano richard a

Or rather, one vet and one fraud, both very, very old. As the nation approached the Civil War centennial in the 1950s, the controversies over the last veteran of the war highlighted the continuing debates about a war that never really ended. The first, Albert Woolson, fought for the Union and would remain and active part of veterans groups until the end of his life. At the time I read about Walter Williams in Life, I knew nothing about the questions of his war time record. Walter Williams, at 117 blind and deaf and bedridden in his daughter's home in Houston, Texas, no longer could tell of his time as a Confederate forage master. About Last of the Blue and Gray Richard Serrano, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist for the Los Angeles Times, pens a story of two veterans.

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SUMMONED AT MIDNIGHT by Richard A. Serrano

last of the blue and gray serrano richard a

As the nation approached the Civil War centennial in the 1950s, the controversies over the last veteran of the war highlighted the continuing debates about a war that never really ended. This review was originally published at. In the late 1950s, as America prepared for the Civil War centennial, two very old men lay dying. The other had been living a great, big lie. This book is a really interesting look at what happened to Civil War veterans in their twilight years, and why some men claimed veteran status even though they never served. Serrano only reveals the poseur at the end; along the way, he examines the claims of other supposed survivors, and he also reveals much about the lives of ordinary soldiers as well as the attitude of their countrymen a century after they fought. Richard Serrano, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist for the Los Angeles Times, pens a story of two veterans.

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LAST OF THE BLUE AND GRAY by Richard A Serrano Read by Dan John Miller

last of the blue and gray serrano richard a

This is a great story, easy to read and full of wonderful detail, one that sheds light not only on the past but on our shifting memories of it. The other had been living a great, big lie. Although there are no more Civil War veterans alive among us, the Civil War brings up unfinished business about the relationship between federal, state, and local authority, the lack of uniformity of culture across all areas of the United States, and questions of racial and economic justice. Beneath this story, however, is a much broader lesson in what happens when history itself is not only ignored but unpreserved. When each man passed, national reaction was a combination of mourning, celebration of their service, and acknowledgment of the closing of a historical chapter. Los Angeles Times reporter Richard Serrano's Last of the Blue and Gray assesses the candidates for this accolade; most seem to have been former Confederate soldiers.

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SUMMONED AT MIDNIGHT by Richard A. Serrano

last of the blue and gray serrano richard a

This is a great story, easy to read and full of wonderful detail, one that sheds light not only on the past but on our shifting memories of it. All but one were fakes. Unfortunately, any true survivors would be well past 100 years old; their memories, to be charitable, would be foggy, and the value of their recollections questionable. One man had indeed served honorably, but the other man had not served at all. This is a short book, and you can tell Serrano is a journalist and not an historian. This theory, not to mention a rumination on the nature of truth when its keepers are all gone, would have made for an interesting tangent had Serrano followed it.

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SUMMONED AT MIDNIGHT by Richard A. Serrano

last of the blue and gray serrano richard a

He is author of One of Ours: Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City Bombing. In this quintessentially American tale, Serrano One of Ours , a Pulitzer Prize—winning journalist for the Los Angeles Times, marshals a formidable amount of research and a winning prose style to solve the mystery of which man—Union loyalist and drummer boy Albert Woolson, or rebel soldier and forage master Walter Williams—was the real deal. This is a fine addition to Civil War collections. Serrano only reveals the poseur at the end; along the way, he examines the claims of other supposed survivors, and he also reveals much about the lives of ordinary soldiers as well as the attitude of their countrymen a century after they fought. Serrano''s grand narrative brings a wealth of American history into its scope and features plenty of larger-than-life characters, cussin'', hollerin'', smoking cigars, and chewing tobacco, and proudly donning their wartime uniforms. Unknown to the public, centennial officials, and the White House too, one of these men was indeed a veteran of that horrible conflict and one according to the best evidence nothing but a fraud.

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'Last of the Blue and Gray' takes on fraudulent Civil War vets

last of the blue and gray serrano richard a

All but one were fakes. I do remember thinking that it was a bit scattered and didn't really build up on the promise that was established early about the people who were pretending to be Civil War veterans. Adding to the uncertainty was the fact that many soldiers lied about personal details in order to serve. That should describe its impact on me--not much. Why the South should be the subject of so many more frauds than the North is something the writer does not speculate on but leaves it to the reader to ponder over for oneself, even as the author notes that the increased availability of documentation has made it possible for pension applications and family clams of military service to be looked at with much greater scrutiny.

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